MOOC my day

Education

MOOC my day

a fistful of moocs because learning is more than moocs and skittles

  1. Now updating for the the latest chapter in the saga, which turns on today’s announcement by Coursera in the NY Times. No doubt the timing, end of semester, was, like an intercession appointment, neither accident nor coincidence.
  2. Well coordinated press releases went out. The news and reactions to it spread on Twitter [sprinkle a few tweets here]
  3. Then the bloggers hit their keyboards
  4. Not all expressed outrage
  5. Now for some backstory…even if you are starting to feel like Jules
  6. This earlier #acadmooc twitter chat thread addresses changes in academic labor that are possible, even likely, outcomes of widespread mooc adoption in public higher education, 
  7. so re: your markets.nitle.org Will the number of colleges change by 2020 BECAUSE of MOOCs #acadmooc
  8. @ronkowitz It’s possible the # of schools will remain, but the # of faculty will drop. #acadmooc
  9. @BryanAlexander If the # of faculty drops, do you think # of admins will rise to support #MOOCs?
  10. @mzedeck I doubt it. More support staff, perhaps. But more adjuncts, more peer tutors. #acadmooc
  11. @BryanAlexander and what about the instruction/staffing architecture? How will it be configured? That is a major worry #acadmooc
  12. @VanessaVaile I think Virginia Tech’s Math Emporium is one model: lots of digital content, learning on demand, low-cost staff. #acadmooc
  13. @BryanAlexander @ronkowitz
    I predict increased faculty b/c of constructivist principles potential 2 redefine/design faculty credential.
  14. @VirginiaACOL Do you mean increased adjunct or t-track faculty? And how will this be paid for? #acadmooc
  15. @VirginiaACOL So you expect increased adjunctification badges MOOCs. That’s certainly one plausible future.
  16. This is where the first part of this Storify originally started… basic introduction, different kinds of moocs. Not all moocs are alike. The original connectivist model is very different from the commercial model most associate with the term. Hopefully, this section will clear up some of those questions as well as introduce issues and concerns leading up to the most recent turn.
  17. Opening video (above) and closing post from Bonnie Stewart excepted, I want avoid rounding up the usual suspects and introduce a few less familiar and expected sources. Eclectic and not trying for comprehensive. You won’t find any higher ed media here either.
    So maybe I should write something connecting links to specifics of assignment…or maybe not. The focus is on assessment. I’m more interested in just in time, continuing education (sometimes designated ‘enrichment’), professional development, than credits or certification, both based on a grading or proof of competency model. Cathy Davidson writes, “The grading model presumes the audience for the grades we assign are consumers of, not agents or participants in, the learning process.”
    By contrast, continuing education, whether informal professional development, information-based networking, enrichment, completion (GED), or prep (for credit/credentialing exams (TOEFL or IELTS for ESL, CLEP or placement tests like COMPASS etc), skirts the borders. There are no grades, no audiences, but agents, participants and self-assessors. 
    Precious little academic prestige or money in any of the above. So? My hand to play as I see fit.
  18. Then there is the ongoing and often contentious MOOCs and the future of higher education debate over whether MOOC is solution or bane. Neither. As long as grades, credits and credentials are at stake, it’s as much about the fistful of dollars as learning. 
  19. Please note the forum line up ~ that alone speaks volumes
  20. All of the above seems almost benign compared to the following…
  21. MOOCs are as much or more of a threat to online for-profit education as to traditional brick and mortarboard institutions. Although tempted, I won’t belabor the irony. 

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